Teaching

Fall 2019

  • Calculus II (Math 151)
  • Calculus III (Math 250)
  • Independent Study: Real Analysis II (by permission only … reach out!)

Spring 2019

  • Calculus II (MATH 151)
  • Real Analysis (MATH 351)
  • Independent Research (MATH 494)
  • Presenting Your Research (UNIV 311): a course for students who are conducting independent research with a faculty mentor; all disciplines are welcome. All students are required to attend the SAGE Student Research Conference, or similar conference, to present a talk or poster. The course is excellent preparation for the CSU Research Competition.
  • OLLI: Human Rationality, Cooperation, and Choice

Fall 2018

  • Calculus I (MATH 150)
  • Calculus II (MATH 151)
  • Computional Shape Classification (UNIV 498)
  • Independent Research (MATH 494)

Spring 2018

  • Calculus II (MATH 151), two sections

Fall 2017

  • Calculus II (MATH 151): a second semester of calculus that covers ideas and techniques from integration through convergence of power series. Each section of the course has an LMS site, and they share a WeBWork site.
  • Differential and Riemannian Geometry (MATH 480): a first course in differentiable geometry, introducing students to the concept of manifolds. Real Analysis (MATH 351) is a recommended pre-requisite, but it may also be taken as a co-requisite.
  • Modern Tools in Mathematics (MATH 399): a laboratory experience for students taking a Calculus course (I, II, or III).  In the spring (2018), I expect to be teaching two courses, too:

Past Teaching

The courses I have taught are organized by mathematics courses (upper- and lower-level) and non-mathematics courses.  Those courses marked with a ‘*’ were developed by me.

Lower-level Mathematics courses

  • Freshman Seminar: A transition course for first-time, first-year students who are interested in pursuing the mathematics major. (Truman State University)
  • Plane Trigonometry: A course in plane trigonometry and function theory (pre-calculus) to prepare students for calculus and college-level mathematics. (Truman State University, University of North Carolina)
  • Elementary Functions: A pre-calculus course covering college algebra and plane trigonometry, preparing students for calculus and college-level mathematics. (Truman State University, University of North Carolina)
  • Basic Statistics: A first course in statistics for students who have completed pre-calculus. Covers descriptive statistics, probability, and hypothesis testing. (Truman State University)
  • Liberal Arts & Sciences Calculus*: A course in the ideas of the Calculus, for students who are not pursuing a STEM degree. Topics included differentiation and tangent lines, ordinary differential equations and systems of ODEs, and integration. (Truman State University)
  • Calculus & Analytic Geometry I: A first course in the Calculus, covering differentiation and integration. Used Mathematica. (Truman State University, 5 credits; University of North Carolina, 3 credits)
  • Calculus & Analytic Geometry II: A second course in the Calculus, covering advanced techniques in integration, sequences and series, and three-dimensional analytic geometry. (Truman State University, 5 credits)
  • Calculus II: A second course in the Calculus, covering advanced techniques in integration, and sequences and series. (CSU Channel Islands, 4 credits)
  • Calculus for Life Science*: A one-semester course covering mathematics of immediate use to biology majors. Topics included differential and integral calculus, ordinary differential equations, graph theory, matrix theory. Used Matlab. Developed with grant funding, NSF-DMS 0926737. (Truman State University)

Upper-level Mathematics courses

  • Linear Algebra: A course in the theory of matrices and linear transformations. Covers vector spaces, transformations, change of basis, and diagonalization. (Truman State University)
  • Ordinary Differential Equations: A first course in ordinary differential equations, their solutions, numerical techniques, and their use in mathematical modeling. (Truman State University)
  • Discrete Mathematics: (Truman State University)
  • Algebraic Structure: A first course in abstract algebra for the mathematics major. (Truman State University)
  • Advanced Calculus I: A first course in real analysis for the mathematics majors. (Truman State University)
  • Advanced Calculus II: A second course in real analysis for the mathematics majors. (Truman State University)
  • Topics in Mathematical Modeling*: A course in the creations, use, and assessment of mathematical models. (Truman State University)
  • Differential Geometry:  A course in survey and surfaces that introduces students to the theory of manifold.
  • Capstone Seminar*: A seminar that assists senior mathematics majors in the completion of their Senior Capstone Integration Experience. (Truman State University)
  • Senior Seminar: A seminar that assists senior mathematics majors in their transition from college to a post-college experience such as a career or graduate school. (Truman State University)
  • Undergraduate Readings in Mathematics: Independent study on a topic in mathematics that merits deep study. Topics pursues include tilings of the plane, game theory, machine learning, and image analysis. (Truman State University)
  • Undergraduate Research: Faculty mentored research with an undergraduate student. (Truman State University)

Non-Mathematics Courses

  • Conflict, Cooperation, and Choice*: A junior interdisciplinary seminar on the topic of rationality, using game theory and economics as paradigms for understanding why we assume humans are rational and what can go wrong when we do. Writing Enhanced. (Truman State University)
  • STEM Seminar*: An interdisciplinary transition course for first-time, first-year students who are interested in pursuing a STEM major. Developed with grant funding, NSF-DMS 0928013. (Truman State University)
  • Inquiry Seminar*: An interdisciplinary seminar for early-career STEM first-year students who want to pursue undergraduate research. Developed with grant funding, NSF-DMS 0928013. (Truman State University)
  • Grant Writing:  An upper-level elective for the Technical Writing emphasis in the English major.  The course covers the grant economy, looking for grants, creating a grant proposal, creating a grant budget, and basic financial compliance issues.  (CSU Channel Islands)
  • Presenting Your Research (UNIV 311)*: a course for students who are conducting independent research with a faculty mentor; all disciplines are welcome. All students are required to attend the SAGE Student Research Conference, or similar conference, to present a talk or poster. The course is excellent preparation for the CSU Research Competition.  (CSU Channel Islands)

Course Development and Co-Curricular Experiences

I’ve lead or supported the development of several courses.  Some were grant-funded efforts, others were in service to my department.  These courses are listed here.

  • Conflict, Cooperation, and Choice: A junior interdisciplinary seminar on the topic of rationality, using game theory and economics as paradigms for understanding why we assume humans are rational and what can go wrong when we do. Writing Enhanced. (Truman State University)
  • SMaCS Seminar: A monthly evening meeting for students involved in the NSF-funded Scholars in Mathematics and Computer Science program,  The meetings built community, provided professional development experiences, and supported excellent students pursuing a degree in mathematics or computer science.  Developed with grant funding, NSF-DUE 0123094. (Truman State University)
  • Capstone Seminar: A seminar that assists senior mathematics majors in the completion of their Senior Capstone Integration Experience. (Truman State University)
  • Topics in Mathematical Modeling: A course in the creations, use, and assessment of mathematical models. (Truman State University)
  • Mathematical Biology Seminar:  A bi-weekly seminar were experts in the mathematical or life sciences presented research to an multi-disciplinary audience with the purpose to raising and illuminating questions at the interface of the life and mathematical sciences.  Developed with grant funding, NSF-DMS 0436348. (Truman State University)
  • Calculus for Life Science: A one-semester course covering mathematics of immediate use to biology majors. Topics included differential and integral calculus, ordinary differential equations, graph theory, matrix theory. Used Matlab. Developed with grant funding, NSF-DMS 0926737. (Truman State University)
  • STEM Seminar: An interdisciplinary transition course for first-time, first-year students who are interested in pursuing a STEM major. Developed with grant funding, NSF-DMS 0928013. (Truman State University)
  • Inquiry Seminar: An interdisciplinary seminar for early-career STEM first-year students who want to pursue undergraduate research. Developed with grant funding, NSF-DMS 0928013. (Truman State University)
  • Presenting Your Research (UNIV 311): a course for students who are conducting independent research with a faculty mentor; all disciplines are welcome. All students are required to attend the SAGE Student Research Conference, or similar conference, to present a talk or poster. The course is excellent preparation for the CSU Research Competition.  (CSU Channel Islands)